Northeast Times

Nutrition

Latest Nutrition Items

    Seeing the value of eye health

    Nutrition is a key component of eye health.


    Chewing the fat about high cholesterol

    When most people go to see their primary care physician, they will inevitably have a discussion on their cholesterol or lipid panel. This is a set of laboratory studies that includes cholesterol subtypes minimally including LDL, HDL and triglyceride cholesterol. Some doctors may choose to order more specialized testing that can include dozens of other cholesterol particle measurements. The overall goal of this type of testing is to help determine an individual’s overall risk for cardiovascular disease including heart attack, stroke and kidney disease.


    Philly Play will help remedy child obesity

    Last summer, I started a program called Philly Play right here in the Northeast. I did so because I was concerned about both the lack of access and information surrounding active play and the growing rate of childhood obesity in our city. We held play-oriented events around the 6th District, hosted community conversations around play and health and ended with a block-long street festival for families.


    Tips to help your mind and body

    Here are some healthy foods to nourish your brain and body.


    Find your protein without the meat

    Going vegetarian one day per week has become more and more popular throughout the United States.


    Fruits and vegetables can combat many illnesses

    During the development of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, multiple studies suggested that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains may offer some protection against cardiovascular disease, Type 2 Diabetes and neurodegeneration.


    H2O is vital

    H2O is so important.


    Medical matters: The slim deal on obesity epidemic

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    Diabetic or not, enjoy healthy meals

    Holiday dining and celebrations are a culinary challenge for most Americans, especially those with diet-related illnesses. While I’m not a diabetic, my family medical history provides a cautionary tale. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 23.6 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but only 17.9 million people actually have been diagnosed. This means approximately 5.7 million people have diabetes and don’t know it.