Northeast Times

Cuisine

Latest Cuisine Items

    Health tips for the spring season

    The sun is shining, snow is melting away, and fresh fruits and vegetables are looking more and more vibrant.


    The lighter side of lemon

    It’s finally spring! The flowers aren’t quite blooming yet, but the snow is over (I hope). As the residue of winter storms have now been turned into water, much of the Northeast has become saturated with sogginess. How much ice and snow is too much? Where will all this water go?


    Potato recipes for St. Patrick’s Day

    Humor is an aid to digestion.


    Pudding from the paddy

    Comfort food is a “love pat for your tummy.” It’s like a delightful, gastronomical hug. Your comfort food may invoke pleasant memories, favorite tastes, or just make you feel happy. Each person’s comfort food is unique to him (or her) self. However, some studies propose that positive emotions cause comfort food eating in men, while negative emotions cause it in women. Caution, ladies: Eat a little comfort food, and walk a little more.


    Beer marinated bliss

    “Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.” Who said that? Was it Smokey the Bear? Regardless, you don’t need smoke signals to know that there’s a barbecue happening. Follow your nose and it will lead you directly to the grill.


    Springtime holiday dishes

    Within the span of one month, our neighborhood got two new residents. My family moved in just weeks before my next-door neighbor, Jeannette, did. Besides being a nice neighbor, Jeannette is a wonderful artist who shares her talents with many of us each week at art class. She’s a patient teacher and a gracious lady. I couldn’t have asked for a better neighbor, even if she were Mr. Rogers.


    Mayfair pizza shop burglarized

    An unknown burglar stole some dough from a Mayfair pizza place on March 11.


    Fishy Fridays

    “All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed. For after all, he was only human. He wasn’t a dog.”  


    South Philly Stromboli

    “I think I was born with a rolling pin in my hand,” I declared as I wielded the instrument of flat destruction across the pizza dough, flattening the lump into one, very thin cover for a Stromboli extraordinaire. We were making a Stromboli — my sister-in-law, Denise, and me. It would be our family’s last visit to Atlanta to see Nanny, my husband’s mother, who was in at-home hospice at Denise’s house. Denise wanted to learn how to make Stromboli. But who can do that without a rolling pin? A previous phone conversation had disclosed that we would be without that necessary tool, so I brought mine along on our trip from Philadelphia.