Northeast Times

Schwartz campaign chest swells to $6.5 million

In oth­er polit­ic­al news: North­east com­munity act­iv­ist John Fritz re­cently an­nounced that he will be a can­did­ate for the Re­pub­lic­an nom­in­a­tion in the 13th Con­gres­sion­al Dis­trict in the May 20 primary. PHOTO COUR­TESY OF FACE­BOOK

U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz’s gubernat­ori­al cam­paign last week an­nounced that it raised $6.5 mil­lion in 2013. 

The cam­paign raised the funds from more than 8,000 in­di­vidu­al donors from every county in Pennsylvania, and from across the coun­try.

A little more than $3 mil­lion of that total was trans­ferred from her fed­er­al cam­paign com­mit­tee.

“With over 8,000 in­di­vidu­al con­trib­ut­ors from all 67 Pennsylvania counties, our cam­paign’s broad grass­roots sup­port shows Pennsylvani­ans are ex­cited about Allyson bring­ing a dif­fer­ent type of lead­er­ship to Har­ris­burg that takes on the status quo,” cam­paign man­ager Corey Dukes said. “As the com­mon­wealth’s next gov­ernor, she’ll bring high ex­pect­a­tions, ef­fect­ive lead­er­ship and a bold vis­ion for Pennsylvania’s fu­ture.”

De­tailed fin­an­cial re­ports are due to the state by Jan. 31.

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Six of sev­en Demo­crats lead Re­pub­lic­an Gov. Tom Corbett in a sur­vey re­leased by Quin­nipi­ac Uni­versity.

Corbett leads John Hanger, former sec­ret­ary of the De­part­ment of En­vir­on­ment­al Pro­tec­tion, 42 per­cent to 37 per­cent.

Former Aud­it­or Gen­er­al Jack Wag­n­er, who has not an­nounced his can­did­acy, leads Corbett 48 per­cent to 36 per­cent.

Oth­ers lead­ing Corbett are U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (45-37), State Treas­urer Rob Mc­Cord (42-39), former DEP Sec­ret­ary Katie Mc­Ginty (44-37), Al­lentown May­or Ed Pawlowski (41-39) and former state De­part­ment of Rev­en­ue Sec­ret­ary Tom Wolf (44-37).

The poll did not in­clude Le­ban­on County Com­mis­sion­er Jo El­len Litz or Max My­ers, a pas­tor, busi­ness­man and au­thor from Cum­ber­land County.

Mike Bar­ley, cam­paign man­ager for Corbett and Lt. Gov. Jim Caw­ley, re­leased the fol­low­ing state­ment: “Gov­ernor Corbett con­tin­ues to keep his prom­ises to the people of Pennsylvania to keep taxes low, spur growth and cre­ate jobs in the private sec­tor. Gov­ernor Corbett ex­pects to have a close elec­tion next year, as all races in Pennsylvania are close. These num­bers rep­res­ent the mil­lions of dol­lars that have been spent by lib­er­al spe­cial-in­terest groups dis­tort­ing the facts on the air these past three years, and in 2014, the gov­ernor will be telling the real story of Pennsylvania mov­ing for­ward.”

••

Bar­ley also com­men­ted on a jobs re­port show­ing Pennsylvania’s un­em­ploy­ment rate down to 7.3 per­cent.

More than 149,000 private sec­tor jobs have been cre­ated since Corbett took of­fice in 2011.

“Des­pite Wash­ing­ton, D.C.’s fail­ures that are hold­ing us back, Gov­ernor Corbett is put­ting Pennsylvania back on track. Gov­ernor Corbett’s lead­er­ship re­form­ing Har­ris­burg, re­du­cing waste­ful spend­ing, keep­ing taxes low, build­ing a stronger en­ergy sec­tor and in­vest­ing in a 21st-cen­tury, first-class trans­port­a­tion net­work and work­force is spur­ring private sec­tor growth and cre­at­ing more op­por­tun­it­ies for fu­ture gen­er­a­tions,” Bar­ley said.

••

Mean­while, U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey has en­dorsed Corbett and Caw­ley.

Toomey cred­ited Corbett and Caw­ley with pre­serving the fisc­al health of the state for fu­ture gen­er­a­tions.

“Un­der the lead­er­ship of the Corbett-Caw­ley team, fisc­al dis­cip­line has re­turned to Har­ris­burg. Wheth­er it was elim­in­at­ing a $4.2 bil­lion de­fi­cit without rais­ing taxes, or en­abling the private sec­tor to cre­ate 141,000 jobs, Gov. Corbett has con­sist­ently cham­pioned policies to pro­tect the tax dol­lars of hard-work­ing Pennsylvani­ans,” he said. “That is an im­press­ive achieve­ment few gov­ernors can claim.”

••

Toomey is up for re-elec­tion, and a new poll has him lead­ing two po­ten­tial Demo­crat­ic op­pon­ents.

Harp­er Polling used an in­ter­act­ive voice re­sponse auto­mated tele­phone sur­vey to con­tact 604 likely voters on Dec. 21-22.

Toomey led state At­tor­ney Gen­er­al Kath­leen Kane, 49 per­cent to 44 per­cent. Sev­en per­cent were not sure.

The in­cum­bent was ahead of former con­gress­man Joe Ses­tak, 49 per­cent to 42 per­cent. Nine per­cent were not sure.

Toomey had double-di­git leads in South­west­ern Pennsylvania, while he trailed by single di­gits in the South­east. He led both Demo­crats among in­de­pend­ents.

Among those sur­veyed, 41 per­cent de­scribed Toomey as “part of the prob­lem” in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. Thirty-eight per­cent said he was “part of the solu­tion. The rest were un­sure.

Forty-four per­cent per­ceive Demo­crat­ic U.S. Sen. Bob Ca­sey Jr. as “part of the prob­lem.” Thirty-five per­cent be­lieve he is “part of the solu­tion.” The rest were un­sure.

••

John Fritz, a long­time com­munity act­iv­ist in the North­east, an­nounced on New Year’s Eve that he will be a can­did­ate for the Re­pub­lic­an nom­in­a­tion in the 13th Con­gres­sion­al Dis­trict in the May 20 primary.

Fritz, a busi­ness­man from Park­wood, ad­dressed sup­port­ers at a party at the United Re­pub­lic­an Club. He touched on his con­cern for the poor and mil­it­ary vet­er­ans.

A Vi­et­nam War vet­er­an, he sup­ports pref­er­ences for vet­er­ans in hir­ing and pre­ser­va­tion of all their be­ne­fits. He op­poses cuts in So­cial Se­cur­ity.

The can­did­ate also men­tioned he sup­ports re­peal of Obama­care. He praised a rul­ing by U.S. Su­preme Court Justice So­nia So­to­may­or that would ex­empt churches and re­lated com­munit­ies from of­fer­ing con­tra­cept­ive and abor­tion ser­vices as part of their be­ne­fit pack­ages for em­ploy­ees.

The dis­trict in­cludes large por­tions of the North­east and Mont­gomery County. In­cum­bent Demo­crat Allyson Schwartz is run­ning for gov­ernor and will not seek re-elec­tion to the House. Four Demo­crats are seek­ing their party’s nom­in­a­tion for the seat. ••

You can reach and at twaring@bsmphilly.com.

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