Northeast Times

H2O is vital

H2O is so im­port­ant.

Wa­ter is the most com­mon com­pound on earth, the flu­id that all life de­pends upon. It’s the one li­quid we all need to live. Did you know that an av­er­age per­son can go al­most two months without eat­ing, but less than a week without wa­ter?

If that did not con­vince you, here are some more reas­ons to make sure you are get­ting enough wa­ter:

• Wa­ter helps to main­tain healthy body weight by in­creas­ing meta­bol­ism and reg­u­lat­ing ap­pet­ite.

• Wa­ter leads to in­creased en­ergy levels. The most com­mon cause of day­time fa­tigue is ac­tu­ally mild de­hyd­ra­tion.

• Drink­ing ad­equate amounts of wa­ter can de­crease the risk of cer­tain types of can­cers, in­clud­ing colon can­cer, blad­der can­cer and breast can­cer.

• For a ma­jor­ity of suf­fer­ers, drink­ing wa­ter can sig­ni­fic­antly re­duce joint and/or back pain. 

• Wa­ter leads to over­all great­er health by flush­ing out wastes and bac­teria that can cause dis­ease.  

• Wa­ter can pre­vent and al­le­vi­ate head­aches.  

• Wa­ter nat­ur­ally mois­tur­izes skin and en­sures prop­er cel­lu­lar form­a­tion un­der­neath lay­ers of skin to give it a healthy, glow­ing ap­pear­ance.  

• Wa­ter aids in the di­ges­tion pro­cess and pre­vents con­stip­a­tion.  

• Wa­ter is the primary mode of trans­port­a­tion for all nu­tri­ents in the body and is es­sen­tial for prop­er cir­cu­la­tion.

How much is enough?

Every day, a hu­man loses wa­ter through breath­ing, per­spir­a­tion, ur­ine and bowel move­ments. For a hu­man body to func­tion prop­erly, we must re­plen­ish our wa­ter sup­ply daily. One pop­u­lar meth­od of cal­cu­lat­ing the ne­ces­sary daily wa­ter in­take is the “8 x 8 rule” — drink eight 8-ounce glasses of wa­ter a day (about 1.9 liters). However, this num­ber will in­crease due to cli­mate change, phys­ic­al activ­ity, health status, and also for preg­nant and breast­feed­ing wo­men. A great way to see if you are get­ting enough wa­ter is to check the toi­let. Your ur­ine should be col­or­less or slightly yel­low if you are get­ting enough wa­ter. ••

Cath­er­ine Gill is a re­gistered di­eti­tian and li­censed di­eti­tian/nu­tri­tion­ist at Wes­ley En­hanced Liv­ing.

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