Northeast Times

Letters to the Editor: March 28, 2012

Free wa­ter ice day should melt away
I want to thank Rita’s wa­ter ice for their an­nu­al free wa­ter ice giveaway on the first day of spring. But could we please stop this tra­di­tion here in the North­east?
I’m tired of see­ing the crit­ters crawl out of the wood­work for es­sen­tially a free dol­lar. It drives me crazy watch­ing these people treat the North­east like their toi­let. They throw their trash wherever they want, dis­respect every­one and everything they come in con­tact with and ba­sic­ally ru­in a nice ges­ture.
Feel free to open a Rita’s in Kens­ing­ton, Lo­gan and North Phil­adelphia and con­tin­ue this prac­tice, but please end it in the North­east.
Jay Bo­sak
Pine Val­ley

So you want to be pres­id­ent? Why?
The Re­pub­lic­ans are hav­ing a hard time se­lect­ing a can­did­ate to run against Pres­id­ent Obama.
A great many people won­der why a per­son would want the job of pres­id­ent. The pay’s not that great when you fig­ure you are on duty 24 hours a day. All the coun­try’s troubles fall on your shoulders. Half the people like you, but the oth­er half hate you.
Whenev­er you go any­where, you need pro­tec­tion. The job is only good for maybe eight years. When you leave of­fice, all the mis­takes you made are writ­ten up in books. So, who needs the ag­grav­a­tion?
Mar­vin Garber
Pennypack

Yo, CLIP, just who do you think you are?
I would like to know what gives CLIP the right to take pho­tos of people’s houses and to go in­to fenced-in private prop­er­ties look­ing for reas­on to hand out stu­pid fines?
I live on a cul-de-sac in Holmes­burg. The oth­er day, I sat on my front steps and watched this wo­man drive up in a CLIP pickup truck, park her truck, get out and then pro­ceed to take pho­tos of my neigh­bor’s house.
She took pho­tos of the front of three houses, then pro­ceeded to walk a few houses up the block to the corner prop­erty, and then entered through a fence gate and walked around the back of the house — I as­sume to take more pho­tos of the back of the three houses that she had just taken pho­tos of.
She then got in her truck and pulled away. A few minutes later she was back, sit­ting in her truck in front of one of the houses pre­vi­ously men­tioned, and writ­ing something.
Who do these people think they are?? What gives them the right to do these things?
It is ri­dicu­lous that we get fines for not hav­ing our prop­er­ties in per­fect con­di­tion, not hav­ing our grass cut in a timely man­ner, for hav­ing our trash in our back yards, or not pick­ing up after our dogs im­me­di­ately.
Why don’t these people try to do something really con­struct­ive like tak­ing care of the drug deal­ers, van­dal­ism, ab­sent­ee land­lords, Sec­tion 8 hous­ing, and oth­er is­sues that are plaguing our neigh­bor­hood?
Dee Mai­aletti

What’s your cell num­ber, John?
The Dauph­in County judge re­ceived more than 100 let­ters sup­port­ing ex-state House Speak­er, Speak­er Emer­it­us John Perzel be­fore his sen­ten­cing for cor­rup­tion last week.
John, if I knew my let­ter would have had some im­pact on your light sen­tence, I would have writ­ten one.
John has done a lot for the com­munity, like hav­ing sev­er­al build­ings named for him with oth­er people’s money, etc. Do you think John can get them to name a cell­b­lock for him?
Why would he use pub­lic funds when he had all that money avail­able from con­tri­bu­tions to the Friends of John Perzel?
John, there is a bright side: You still will be able to have meals paid by the state without hav­ing to be re-elec­ted.
May­er Krain
Mod­ena Park

Booze at Burholme Park’s golf cen­ter
Re­cre­ation Com­mis­sion­er and Deputy May­or Mi­chael DiB­er­ardinis ter­min­ated the Burholme Park golf con­ces­sion lease of the Eddy Lee fam­ily and made a new own­er.
The amended re­quest for pro­pos­al gave the new own­er per­mis­sion to serve beer and wine to cus­tom­ers, and serve it after golf hours, all year.
The city agreed to ad­vert­ise al­co­hol­ic bever­age on this pub­lic park to im­prove the lease­hold­er’s private profit. I sup­pose the busi­ness­man’s lunch is beer and pret­zels.
When we had a real Fair­mount Park Com­mis­sion, all leases were heard be­fore the real com­mis­sion with pub­lic de­bate, and no al­co­hol was ever al­lowed.
Mr. Lee al­ways gave us a valu­able place for youths to en­joy, while the profits went back to the city to squander in the gen­er­al fund, and not the Ry­erss Trust to sup­port the park.
Fred Maurer
Ol­ney

Act­or-teach­er Tony Danza: I sup­port North­east High
Re: As a teach­er, Tony Danza’s school days are be­hind him (Com­ment­ary, March 7 edi­tion)
North­east Times ed­it­or John Scan­lon seems to have it in for me. He doesn’t seem to think that I should have any­thing to say about budget cuts and the Phil­adelphia pub­lic schools. He’s right that there are many teach­ers and ad­min­is­trat­ors who have had much more ex­per­i­ence in a classroom than I have and, as he wrote, “could have con­veyed those rig­ors quite elo­quently at a mi­cro­phone…”
It’s the next part of the sen­tence that seems to un­der­mine his ar­gu­ment that I shouldn’t be the one speak­ing for the teach­ers and about school fund­ing in Phil­adelphia. The rest goes like this: “yet they’re home, watch­ing Tony Danza on the 6 o’clock news tell every­one how tough their jobs are.”
It begs the ques­tion, would those “elo­quent teach­ers” be on the 6 o’clock news if I wasn’t there? Maybe not. John Scan­lon might have even found something else to write about. That’s why state Sen. Mike Stack, when he heard that I was in town do­ing our fund-raiser at North­east High, asked me to join him for his press con­fer­ence.
I be­lieved in what he was say­ing, that the budget cuts are short­sighted and hurt­ing our chil­dren, so it was an easy call to stand ”shoulder to shoulder” with the sen­at­or. I do get back to my school and it’s pretty ob­vi­ous that when so many staff and pro­grams have been elim­in­ated, that the kids are be­ing hurt.
I’m sorry the North­east Times did not get along with A&E. That makes two of us. But the show was a real at­tempt to il­lus­trate what is hap­pen­ing in Amer­ica’s pub­lic schools.
I have nev­er said I “paid my dues as a teach­er.” I know I haven’t. But I was there, and what I wit­nessed made me speak out when I got the chance, while try­ing to do some tan­gible things to help North­east High School. Once a Vik­ing al­ways a Vik­ing.
By the way, the fund-raiser was a suc­cess with about 2,000 people in at­tend­ance. I so thank the com­munity. It was a great night. The stu­dent team beat the teach­er team and a stu­dent named Alex San­ti­ago won first prize with a poem he wrote. You should have seen it. We missed you.
Tony Danza

8th PDAC is more than a so­cial club
Al­though my first in­clin­a­tion after read­ing the North­east Times March 14 art­icle, 8th Dis­trict PDAC looks to change things up, was to re­frain from com­ment­ing, I ul­ti­mately felt that as an of­ficer of the former 8th PDAC board, a reply was war­ran­ted on be­half of the board mem­bers and trust­ees who     di­li­gently served dur­ing the 2010-12 term.
I dis­agree with the chair­man’s state­ment that the PDAC “really got off track of what the PDAC was foun­ded for” and felt that the art­icle merely por­trayed us as some sort of so­cial club.
While it’s true that dur­ing our ten­ure, we proudly hos­ted many free activ­it­ies for the com­munity, the con­trib­ut­ors to this art­icle failed to men­tion the vari­ous events that we sponsored spe­cific­ally rel­ev­ant to our mis­sion as a PDAC. In our identi­fy­ing com­munity prob­lems, ana­lyz­ing their causes, and de­vel­op­ing meth­ods to re­solve these prob­lems, we:
• Im­ple­men­ted the suc­cess­ful gun buy­back pro­gram in 2010 in which dozens of guns were sur­rendered to the 8th dis­trict.
• In our be­lief that edu­ca­tion is the key in solv­ing prob­lems with­in our com­munity, we fin­an­cially sponsored and co-hos­ted the monthly burg­lary sem­inars dur­ing 2011 to raise the level of pub­lic aware­ness to the in­crease of burg­lar­ies
• In ad­dress­ing the dis­trict’s un­der­age drink­ing prob­lem, some of us be­came ment­ors and vo­lun­teered to over­see the com­munity ser­vice sen­tences im­posed on them by the court.
• We also pur­sued the pos­sib­il­ity of rent­ing a drunk­en-driv­ing sim­u­lat­or car for one day, in­vit­ing area teens to sit be­hind the wheel of this spe­cial­ized vehicle, which would al­low them to ex­per­i­ence the sen­sa­tion of driv­ing drunk.
• Re­gret­fully, the art­icle also made no men­tion of our suc­cess­ful and well-at­ten­ded 2010 and 2011 Na­tion­al Night Out com­munity crime pre­ven­tion pro­gram geared to height­en both crime- and drug-pre­ven­tion aware­ness.
• Still fo­cus­ing on the edu­ca­tion­al as­pect, we sponsored crime pre­ven­tion es­say con­tests for chil­dren.
Fur­ther­more, dur­ing our com­munity fest­ivals and chil­dren-ori­ented pro­grams that ap­pear now to have come un­der dis­fa­vor, we en­cour­aged chil­dren to per­son­ally en­gage in pos­it­ive in­ter­ac­tion with the of­ficers while also ex­per­i­en­cing the isol­a­tion and stark real­ity of sit­ting in a jail cell.
As a res­ult of vis­it­ing the cell­b­lock, it was our hope that this would cre­ate a last­ing im­pres­sion on these young minds in de­ter­ring any fu­ture re­vis­its to a sim­il­ar cell in their later years!
On a per­son­al note, after two years, both of my grand­sons still vividly re­mem­ber their cell vis­it ex­per­i­ence. Mis­sion ac­com­plished!
Hav­ing the PDAC mem­ber­ship com­prised of rep­res­ent­at­ives of the dis­trict’s civic as­so­ci­ations and Town Watches is not a new concept for an 8th PDAC board. Let­ters in­vit­ing each pres­id­ent to join were mailed on Feb. 12, 2010, and many com­plied.
I main­tain that our coun­cil has in­deed been “on track” these past few years, res­ult­ing in high-level po­lice ad­min­is­trat­ors be­stow­ing ac­col­ades of praise ap­plaud­ing the 8th PDAC as “one of the best in the city.”
We worked fas­ti­di­ously for this hon­or and through the ef­forts of its new board, it is hoped that the coun­cil will con­tin­ue to achieve even great­er ac­com­plish­ments in the fu­ture.
Elsie Stevens
Past cor­res­pond­ing sec­ret­ary/vice chair­wo­man 8th PDAC

Abor­tion is not in the Con­sti­tu­tion
In re­sponse to last week’s ed­it­or­i­al (Say what, Tom?) re­gard­ing the pro­posed abor­tion bill in the Pennsylvania Le­gis­lature re­quir­ing a wo­man to un­der­go an ul­tra­sound be­fore mur­der­ing her un­born child, I would like to point out that the au­thor is for­get­ting one small de­tail — the Con­sti­tu­tion of the United States.
The 14th Amend­ment states, “[] nor shall any State de­prive any per­son of LIFE, liberty, or prop­erty without due pro­cess of law…”
Sev­en Su­preme Court justices de­cid­ing, by ju­di­cial fi­at on high, that an in­ven­ted “right to pri­vacy” trumps this crys­tal-clear clause is by no means “settled law.”
Un­der our con­vo­luted jur­is­pru­dence, states are per­mit­ted to reg­u­late abor­tion so long as it does not con­sti­tute an “un­due bur­den” to a wo­man’s abil­ity to murder her un­born child.
I agree that the gov­ern­ment, to the ut­most ex­tent, should stay out of our bed­rooms and doc­tor’s of­fices. But when it comes to pro­tect­ing the most fun­da­ment­al right en­shrined in the Con­sti­tu­tion, it is hardly an un­due bur­den for the state to man­date that a wo­man have more in­form­a­tion be­fore tak­ing such a drastic ac­tion.
Hell, Pennsylvania man­dates that child ab­use be re­por­ted and chil­dren wear seat belts. We shouldn’t take an ex­tra step to help save a child’s life be­fore he/she even has a chance to start it?
Ry­an C. Ditch­kof­sky
May­fair

Speak your mind  …
Short let­ters have a bet­ter chance of get­ting pub­lished. All let­ters are sub­ject to edit­ing and MUST in­clude the writer’s full name along with day­time and even­ing phone num­bers for veri­fic­a­tion pur­poses. An­onym­ous let­ters will NOT be pub­lished. Mail to: Let­ters to the Ed­it­or, North­east Times, 2512 Met­ro­pol­it­an Drive, Tre­vose, PA 19053. Fax: 215-355-4857. E-mail: pronews@bsmphilly.com

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